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Today’s interesting little tid-bit comes from the always surprisingly informative Science wing of CRACKED.com. This is actually just an excerpt from the much larger, but no less informative and entertaining piece titled 6 Insane Coincidences You Won’t Believe Actually Happened.

A Terrifyingly Accurate Prediction by Edgar Allan Poe…

By:

In 1838, future horror-god Edgar Allan Poe released a book called The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, his only full novel. The book was such a bomb that Poe eventually agreed with his critics that it was “a very silly book” (yet still good enough to inspire heavyweights like Jules Verne and Herman Melville to write Moby Dick and An Antarctic Mystery–yes, Poe was a badass).


PIMP.

Where it Gets Weird:

Poe did a Blair Witch thing with his novel, which claimed to be based on true events. This turned out to be a half-truth: The real life events simply had not happened yet.

One scene in The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket visits a whaling ship lost at sea, taking with it all but four crewmen. Out of food, the men drew lots to see who would be eaten, the unfortunate decision landing on a young cabin boy named Richard Parker.


Before fathering Spider-Man and being double-crossed by the Red Skull!
Editor’s note: Change that. You’re an idiot.

Forty-six years later, there was an actual disaster at sea involving the Mignonette. It became famous due to the legal consequences of some gruesome events on board, specifically the way the men drew lots and decided to eat their cabin boy…

Where it Gets Even Weirder:

…who was named Richard Parker.


Richard Parker: aged 17 years.

The bizarre story was discovered decades later by Nigel Parker, a distant cousin of the Richard Parker who got eaten. You can only imagine what the fuck went through his mind when he stumbled upon the connection.


Hell, this was us!

And that would go down as the freakiest unintentional prediction of future events in a work of fiction, if it were not completely blown away by…

 

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